The First Pedestrian School Entrance for Students

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The First Pedestrian School Entrance for Students

The new entrance located approximately 50 meters down from Las Fresas been used by students after school.

The new entrance located approximately 50 meters down from Las Fresas been used by students after school.

The new entrance located approximately 50 meters down from Las Fresas been used by students after school.

The new entrance located approximately 50 meters down from Las Fresas been used by students after school.

Juan Felipe Gaviria, Discoverer Staff Writer

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This February a new pedestrian walkway into the school was opened below “Las Fresas” allowing high school students to come in walking for the first time.

To avoid more cars entering into school and students hitching rides from strangers, a pedestrian entrance was made for high schools students to enter and exit school with a signed permissions slip from their parents which eliminates the necessity of having every single student come in or exit via car.

“Sometimes it was really hard to get someone to help me and I ended up arriving really late because it took a long time to find someone to enter,” 12th grade TCS student, Alejandro Gomez, said.

Having people come into school by car only made students find a way to enter the school without giving up the commodity of driving their own which sometimes ended up in consequences that interfered with learning.

“The pedestrian entrance helped us move traffic away from Palmas and into the road of Las Fresas and helped us keep our students safe by not requiring us them to hitch a ride from a stranger,” Superintendent of TCS, Ruth Allen, said.

Safety was also a concern because some students were finding taxis and insecure drivers in their desperation to drive into school.

“We thought that it was actually creating more problems as students were using random drivers, creating actually more traffic for ourselves,” Allen, said.

When students couldn’t hitch a ride they had to call another car for them to enter, creating traffic inside the school and making students to take longer to go into class.

“I like the mentality of the school, we will keep driving to school, no matter what they do, they might as well make it a safer experience if they can,” Gomez, said.

Instead of fighting against an upwards current the school sought for a way to help students to ride their cars to school and making it safe at the same time as this new entrance will be the most frequent users of this new entrance.

“It is an elegant solution, I hope future generations enjoy something we always dreamed of as seniors,” Gomez, said.