TCS student government tries to limit the cutlery loss from the Cafeteria.

*Students are leaving the plates and utensils that belong to the cafeteria all over the place, many utensils are being found on the soccer fields and in the trash. The school has been made aware that many students leave their plates behind where they sit. According to senior Daniel Zuloaga, “Many students that eat far away leave their plates and cutlery where they were sitting and don’t return it.”

Sebastian Duque

*Students are leaving the plates and utensils that belong to the cafeteria all over the place, many utensils are being found on the soccer fields and in the trash. The school has been made aware that many students leave their plates behind where they sit. According to senior Daniel Zuloaga, “Many students that eat far away leave their plates and cutlery where they were sitting and don’t return it.”

Felipe Santamaria, Discoverer Staff Writer

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In hopes of reducing the amount of cutlery that is lost from the cafeteria, NHS and High School administrators invite students to help propose changes to solve the ongoing issue.

The school is not satisfied with previously proposed solutions to reduce the 200 utensils lost on average from the cafeteria. In the search for a more permanent and efficient solution, the school decided to have student workshops about the issue. The workshops are designed to create awareness about the issue and its effects while at the same time it gives students an opportunity to propose solutions.

“The main plan right now is trying to understand why and how the cutlery is getting lost that is why we had a meeting with GIN and NHS leaders,”  Jorge Vasquez, NHS advisor said.

Vasquez is one of the staff members involved in the school’s campaign to take care of the school’s items. He explained that the school´s first steps were to involve students in this process by having meetings with scholars ‘leaders’ like NHS members and GIN members. In these meetings, the students analyzed the causes of the issue and later on proposed solutions. 

“The idea is to continue the process with even more students, to do this we capacitated  NHS and GIN members to conduct workshops with students from all of high school,” Vasquez said.

In later meetings, the student leaders were taught how to conduct the same meetings they were part of. This way students could spread the whole workshops to students of all of high school. Having in mind many juniors complain of the rising price in the cafeteria, the purpose of having these workshops was not only to receive ideas from students but to create consciousness on the issue.

“Some time ago there was a group of kids who bent and damaged the utensils used in the cafeteria which resulted in the cafeteria justifying their higher prices,” Daniel Zuluoaga, a senior student said.

The workshop was also meant to create consciousness among students and teachers as to the carelessness and indifference towards school property, as this behavior was highlighted as one of the main causes of this matter.

“Being the only school with a problem of missing cutlery from Serviexpress’s network leaves a bad image of the school, therefore we must do something to improve in our behavior. We must return to the culture we had when the cafeteria was being built of taking care of the shared property and I believe the best way to do so is by working with student leaders and collaborating with faculty and the kids,” Vasquez said.