Regulating Mining in La Guajira

Photo+Courtesy+of+Google+Search%0Ahttps%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com.co%2Fsearch%3Fq%3Dmina%2Bdel%2Bcerrejon%2Bla%2Bguajira%26safe%3Dstrict%26source%3Dlnms%26tbm%3Disch%26sa%3DX%26ved%3D0ahUKEwilkYelwtXZAhXErFkKHXWiCZ4Q_AUICigB%26biw%3D1240%26bih%3D594%23imgrc%3DeI3o3ud93yapCM%3A

Britta Kathryn Mc Carthy

Photo Courtesy of Google Search https://www.google.com.co/search?q=mina+del+cerrejon+la+guajira&safe=strict&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwilkYelwtXZAhXErFkKHXWiCZ4Q_AUICigB&biw=1240&bih=594#imgrc=eI3o3ud93yapCM:

Nicolas Buhofer, Contributor

In this picture we can summarize how mining affects people, but mostly in a bad way. It is most harmful for the people that live in poverty because in this picture they use water that could be used for the people, and they have no sustainable water and in some cases, they die of dehydration. This also affects land animals and destroys their habitat. This problem is most pertinent for the Wayuu people that depend on this water and El Cerrejon is taking it away from them. This takes the agriculture away in some cases their cooking needs as well. This also affects the government. In other words, it is corrupt because it lies to its own people by saying the Wayuu have access to river water when they don’t actually recieve that percentage but much less. The solution is government regulation and transparency. One way to achieve this is negotiation of needs. Other ways include denouncing corrupt politicians, and peaceful protest to encourage the government.