Ukraine on the counterattack, Russian Generals being killed left & right.

Tomas Tobon, Chief Copy Editor

1st Frontline Map: Mar 24, 2022

2nd Frontline Map: Mar 31, 2022

 

General Overview

  • Russian offensives have been generally stalled throughout the week suffering extremely heavy equipment losses that slow down, even more, the possible advances that could have happened during such a brief period of time. Foreign equipment in aid of the Ukrainian war effort has finally started being used in great numbers, putting Russia’s capability to wage war into question. Another interesting development is the deaths of very important Russian military commanders at the hands of Ukrainian snipers, special forces units, airstrikes and during active battles in various cities. Here is the list of them:

 

  1. Captain First Rank Andrey Paliy, Deputy Commander of Russia’s the Black Sea Fleet
  2. Major General Andrei Sukhovetsky, Deputy Commander of The 41st Combined Arms Army.
  3. Major General Andrei Kolesnikov, Commander of The 29th Combined Arms Army.
  4. Colonel Sergei Sukharev, Commander of The Kostroma Guards 331st Parachute Assault Regiment.
  5. Major General Oleg Mityaev, Commander of The 150th Motorized Rifle Division.
  6. Major General Vitaly Gerasimov, Deputy Commander of The 41st Combined Arms Army.
  7. Lieutenant General Andrei Mordvichev, Commander of The 8th General Army Of The Southern Military District.
  8. Colonel Andrei Zakharov, Commander of The 6th Tank Regiment Of The 90th Tank Division.
  9. Colonel Konstantin Zizevsky, Commander of The 247th Guards Air Assault Regiment.
  10. Lieutenant Colonel Yuri Agarkov, Commander of A 33rd Motorized Rifle Regiment.
  11. Lieutenant Colonel Dmitry Safronov, Commander of The 61st Separate Marine Brigade.
  12. Lieutenant Denis Glebov, Deputy Commander of The 11th Separate Airborne Assault Brigade.
  13. General Magomed Tushaev, Commander of The 141st Motorized Regiment Of The Chechen National Guard.
  14. Colonel Vladimir Zhoga, Commander Of The Sparta Battalion, A Pro-Russian Separatist Force.
  15. Colonel Sergei Porokhnya, Commander Of Russia’s 12th Engineer Brigade.
  16. Georgy Dudorov, Deputy Commander of an Airborne Reconnaissance Division.
  17. Captain Alexey Glushchak, Russian Spy & Commander-GRU Military Intelligence Unit.
  18. Colonel Alexei Sharov, Commander of the 810th Guards Regiment.
  19. Lieutenant General Yakov Rezantsev, Commander of the Russian 49th combined army.

 

Bronze Marked Area(s):

  • Previously encircled Ukrainian National Guard units to the east of the capital, Kyiv, have broken through the Russian encirclement and are starting to turn back Russian advances near the strategic towns of Bobrovystja, Nova Rasan’, Perenoha and Brovary. The latter is the closest to Kyiv. Ukrainian counterattacks pushed pack one of Russia’s armoured columns all the way from the town of Malyn to Borodyanka, setting back Russia’s advance by more than two weeks’ progress.

 

Purple Marked Area(s):

  • One of Ukraine’s largest cities, Chernihiv, which was previously surrounded by Russia while getting pounded day after day by missile strikes, received a massive relief force in the form of Ukrainian national guard units. This caused a mass surrender of Russian personnel near the city’s airport after an intense firefight. Around 100 aircraft from the Russian Federal Air Force, including Fighters, Transports, Oilers and Helicop have been reportedly captured by Ukrainian units. The city of Chernihiv now has a stable supply line as civilians continue to flee through the river paths to safety in neighbouring countries.

 

Black Marked Area(s):

  • Ukrainian tank units with help from the Ukrainian air force and infantry components of the army, managed to retake a massive chunk of northeast Ukraine, reaching the original border with Russia on the 28th of March. The city of Shotska, along with the towns of Krovelets, Svesa, Pyrohivka, Korop, Kholmy and Sosnytsa have been retaken. Russian forces in the area are in full retreat.

 

Red Marked Area(s):

  • The Russian attempt to encircle and starve the border city of Sumy failed completely as a Ukrainian contingent broke through Russian lines and drove them back. Russian losses just in that area of the conflict are estimated to be between 1,000-3,000, marking it one of the deadliest zones in the entire conflict.

 

White Marked Area(s):

  • The street fighting in the Ukrainian city of Sievierodonetsk has come to an end after almost two weeks of fighting. Russian forces are victorious as the last remnants of Ukrainian national guard units fight a slow retreat while being harassed by Russian airpower. Lysychansk on the other hand holds on as even Russian commanders in the area express distaste for how well the Ukrainian soldiers are defending.

 

Green Marked Area(s):

  • An impressive push by some of the remaining Ukrainian armoured tank corps has made a massive breakthrough in the hopes of reaching the important port city of Mariupol. Russian forces had already occupied much of the area all the way to the towns of Pokrovs’ke and Berezove but the valiant Ukrainian counterattack has sent Russian army units on full retreat. As the Ukrainian soldiers on Snake Island said at the beginning of the conflict; “Russian warship, go f**k yourself.”

 

Blue Marked Area(s):

  • Russian objectives in the area included the capture of one of Ukraine’s largest nuclear power plants, the Yuzhnoukrainsk Nuclear Facility. Having reached as far as 50km away from the facility, Ukrainian amassed a good chunk of reserve units and paramilitary organizations in the area to try and push back the inevitable Russian overtake. Fortunately for the defenders, the top two Russian commanders of that operation got taken out and killed during a daring airstrike by the Ukrainian Air Force. With the chain of command broken, Russian forces started to retreat en-masse. They also got pushed back from the towns of Pokrov, Zelenodolsk, Liubymivka, Velyka Oleksandrivka and Borozenske, all of which had been occupied by Russia since the first week of the conflict.